New York State SFY23 Executive Budget Health Focus Highlights

NY State Government: Week in Review


Authors: Michael Paulsen, Greg Pratt, Hailey Davis, Olga Deshchenko, Michael Budros, Julia Donnaruma

On January 18, 2022, Governor Kathy Hochul released her budget proposal for State Fiscal Year 2023. While record-breaking in its size—totaling $216.3 billion—and inclusive of many investments in Medicaid and health care more broadly, the Executive Budget also proposes some notable changes to the state’s health care delivery system. This memorandum provides a summary of health-focused highlights included in the Article VII proposals and appropriations in the Governor’s budget proposal. Manatt will also be providing a summary of the broader Executive Budget in the coming days. In the meantime, if you have any questions or comments, please do not hesitate to reach out to a member of the Manatt team.

Table of Contents

Health and Medicaid

Healthcare Workforce Proposals

Healthcare Workforce Bonuses. The Executive Budget would establish Healthcare Workforce Bonuses, which would provide health care and mental hygiene workers with a one-time bonus of up to $3,000. Eligible employees include health care and mental hygiene practitioners, technicians, assistants and aides who provide hands-on health or care services to individuals who received an annualized base salary of less than $100,000. The Department of Health (DOH) would develop guidelines and procedures for providers to submit information necessary for DOH to provide reimbursement to employers to fund employee bonuses.

The proposal authorizes the Office of the Medicaid Inspector General (OMIG) to review and audit employer claims for reimbursement and deems claims inappropriately paid to be an overpayment subject to recovery by OMIG. An employer that fails to identify, claim and pay any bonus to more than 10% of its employees eligible for the bonus will also be subject to penalties. The Executive Budget associates $1.2 billion in investments in SFY23 for this proposal, which would take effect on April 1, 2022.

Nurses Across New York Program. The Executive Budget would enact a new loan repayment program for registered professional nurses designed to encourage nurses to practice in underserved areas of the state. Nurses working for three years or more in areas designated by the Commissioner would be eligible for the program. One-third of the funds for the program would be targeted at New York City and the remaining two-thirds to the rest of state. The Executive Budget associates $2.5 million in investments in SFY23 and $3.0 million in SFY24 with the program. There are no savings associated with the proposal, which would take effect on April 1, 2022.

Interstate Medical Licensure and Nursing Compacts. The Executive Budget would adopt provisions of law allowing the state to enter both the Interstate Medical Licensure Compact and the Interstate Nursing Compact. The compacts, if the state were to join them, would allow qualifying practitioners in other compact member states to apply for expedited licensure in New York upon designating New York as their new principal state of license. The Executive Budget also proposes a process to authorize the issuing of temporary permits for high-need health care professionals to practice in the state while their applications to seek licensure in New York are pending. The Executive Budget does not associate any savings or investments in the adoption of the proposal in either SFY23 or SFY24, which would take effect on April 1, 2022.

Scope-of-Practice Reforms. The Executive Budget proposes a number of scope-of-practice reforms for health care professionals, including:

  • Amending the definition of “qualified health care professional” under Public Health Law to include pharmacists, allowing them to perform noninvasive tests under their scope of practice.
  • Amending Education Law to permit pharmacists as qualified health care professionals to direct a limited-service laboratory and to order and administer FDA approved tests, subject to CLIA waivers.
  • Amending Education Law to establish 3,600 practice hours as a threshold beyond which nurse practitioners would no longer require collaborative agreements to practice with physicians, and relaxes the 90-day filing period for collaborative agreements.
  • Making permanent the provisions of the Nurse Practitioners Modernization Act, which would otherwise expire on June 30, 2022.
  • Permitting certified medication aides to administer routine and prefilled prescriptions, and to conduct medication-related tasks in residential health care facilities, under supervision of a registered professional nurse and in compliance with regulations to be promulgated by the commissioner of health.
  • Allowing physicians and nurse practitioners to order non-patient-specific regimens for the testing of patients for COVID-19, influenza and other upper respiratory illnesses.
  • Allowing individuals under the training and supervision of a physician, registered nurse or nurse practitioner to collect specimens for COVID-19 or influenza testing. 

The Executive Budget does not associate any savings or investments in the adoption of the proposal in either SFY23 or SFY23, which would take effect on April 1, 2022, and would sunset on March 31, 2024.

Transfer of Oversight for Licensed Health Care Professions. The Executive Budget would transfer the oversight of licensed health care professions from the State Education Department to the DOH, effective January 1, 2023. Professions subject to this transfer include, but are not limited to, physicians, nursing, pharmacy, dentistry, psychology, social work, physical therapy, occupational therapy and mental health practitioners. The Executive Budget does not associate any savings or investments in the adoption of the proposal in SFY23, which would take effect on January 1, 2023.

Statewide Modernization of Emergency Medical Services. The Executive Budget contemplates several measures addressing emergency medical services in the state, including:

  • Expansion of the reporting and advisory duties of the State Emergency Medical Services Council and the regional councils to assist the commissioner on issues including, but not limited to, the recommendation, periodic revision and application of rules and regulations, appropriateness review standards, treatment protocols, and quality improvement standards.
  • Establishment of a statewide emergency medical services quality and sustainability program, which would authorize the commissioner to promulgate regulations supporting the program’s goals including, but not limited to, clinical standards, quality metrics, safety standards, emergency vehicle operator standards, clinical competencies, sustainability metrics, and minimum requirements for quality assurance and sustainability assurance programs to be followed by emergency medical services agencies. Enforcement and oversight authority for the program may be delegated by the department to contracted entities or counties as determined by the commissioner.
  • Creation of a comprehensive statewide emergency medical services system plan. Regional emergency medical advisory councils will be required to develop and submit plans for departmental approval. Counties will also be required to develop county-level plans for approval by the department.
  • Creation of an emergency medical services training program within amounts appropriated, including unified minimum education standards, curricula and requirements for training programs. The program would also include a wellness and mental health program for emergency medical services personnel to provide resources for the workforce.
  • Creation of a certificate of need process for the establishment of new emergency medical services programs.
  • Expansion of the definition of Emergency Medical Service under Article 30 of the Public Health Law. 

The Executive Budget associates a one-time $5 million investment in SFY23, and there are no further savings associated with the proposal, which would take effect on April 1, 2022.

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Capital Program Proposals

Healthcare Transformation Program. The Executive Budget would include a $1.6 billion health care capital program, which includes the following components:

  • Authorizes the commissioner of health to award up to $450 million for unfunded project applications submitted in response to the Statewide III RFA, to be awarded no later than December 31, 2022. This amount is in addition to the $208 million made available under the RFA. Of the additional $450 million that can be awarded in response to Statewide III, the Executive Budget would require minimum awards of:
    • $25 million for community-based health care providers, defined as Article 28 diagnostic and treatment centers
    • $25 million for all other community-based providers under the current RFA
    • $50 million for residential health care facilities or adult care facilities
  • Allocates up to $200 million for the modernization of emergency departments of regional significance.
  • Authorizes up to $750 million in grants to health care providers or capital projects that build innovative, patient-centered models of care; increase access to care; improve care quality; and ensure health care provider financial sustainability.
  • Authorizes up to $150 million to build out IT infrastructure and telehealth capabilities across all provider types eligible under the Statewide Transformation Program.
  • Authorizes up to $50 million for the implementation of the Green House nursing home initiative. 

The Executive Budget projects a state fiscal impact of $35 million in SFY23, $75 million in SFY24, $205 million in SFY25, $270 million in SFY26 and $265 million in SFY27. The remaining investment of $750 million will be disbursed beyond SFY27.

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Medicaid Program Proposals

Changes to the Medicaid Global Cap. The Executive Budget would change the metric for the Medicaid Global Cap from the ten-year rolling average of the Consumer Price Index medical care component (CPI-M) to the five-year rolling average of Medicaid spending within the National Health Expenditure Accounts produced by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) actuary, which would support additional Medicaid spending growth of $366 million in SFY 2023 (above the previous index), growing to $3.1 billion in SFY 2027. It would also extend the statutory provisions of the Global Cap.

Increases to Medicaid Provider Rates. The Executive Budget would increase provider rates by restoring the 1.5% “across the board” reductions to fee-for-service (FFS) providers implemented in the SFY21 budget and an additional 1% increase to all Medicaid provider reimbursement rates. The increased rates recognize growth in service costs and will provide flexibility to respond to market needs and compete in the labor market to attract qualified workers.

Expansion of Eligibility for Seniors and People With Disabilities. The Executive Budget would expand Medicaid eligibility for low-income New Yorkers over age 65 and people with disabilities, when they become eligible for Medicare, by eliminating the Medicaid resource eligibility test and raising the eligibility income level to 138% of federal poverty level (FPL). This proposal would take effect January 1, 2023, and have a state share investment of $5 million in SFY23, growing to $20 million in SFY24.

Expansion of Postpartum Coverage. The Executive Budget would work with the Biden administration to provide Medicaid postpartum coverage for mothers for up to one year, increasing from 60 days after they give birth. Pending federal approval, the Executive Budget would also amend state law to include both prenatal and postpartum services as “standard coverage” to be reimbursed when determined necessary by providers. Pregnant individuals who may be ineligible for Medicaid due only to immigration status would qualify for these services.

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Managed Care Proposals

Managed Care Plan Procurement. The Executive Budget would give the DOH authority to competitively procure managed care plans participating in Mainstream, Health and Recovery Plan (HARP), managed long-term care (MLTC), and Medicaid Advantage Plus (MAP) programs. HIV SNP and PACE plans would be excluded from such competitive bidding. The Executive Budget proposes criteria for DOH to consider in reviewing plans’ proposals, including:

  • Accessibility and geographic distribution of network providers, factoring in the needs of individuals with disabilities
  • The extent to which major public hospitals are included in the provider network
  • Demonstrated cultural and language competencies
  • Not-for-profit status
  • The ability to offer plans in multiple regions
  • The type and number of products the bidder proposes to operate
  • Participation in products for integrated care for dual-eligibles
  • Participation in VBP contracting, including “delegation of significant financial risk to clinically integrated provider networks”
  • Commitment to participation in managed care in the state
  • Commitment to quality improvement
  • Commitment to “community reinvestment spending” (to be defined in procurement)
  • Past performance in meeting contract requirements and, if applicable, addressing identified deficiencies
  • Any additional criteria developed with other state agencies, such as the Office of Mental Health (OMH) and the Office of Addiction Services and Supports (OASAS).

The Executive Budget calls for DOH to review bids in consultation with other state agencies, as appropriate. For each applicable product line, DOH would be required to select at least two and no more than five plans in each geographic region. Contracts would run for a term to be determined by DOH, which may be renewed or modified without a new request for proposals (RFP). This procurement proposal would take effect on October 1, 2023. We understand the state is assuming $100 million in savings in the out years from this procurement proposal.

Limits on the Number of HARP Plans. The Executive Budget would give DOH, OMH and OASAS the authority to select a limited number of plans “capable of managing the behavioral and physical health needs of Medicaid enrollees with significant behavioral health needs.”

Moratorium on New Plans.

  • The Executive Budget proposes, effective April 1, 2022, until the date DOH releases the above RFP, placing a moratorium on new mainstream managed care plan applications and applications to expand the scope of eligible enrollee populations (with several exceptions, such as instances of transfer of ownership of existing plans or service area expansions).
  • The Executive Budget would extend the existing MLTC plan moratorium to be in effect until the date DOH releases the above RFP. 

Quality Pool Restoration. The Executive Budget would “fully restore” $77 million in the Mainstream and MLTC quality incentive programs.

Increases to MAP and HIV SNP Rates. The Executive Budget would invest $34.7 million in the MAP and HIV SNP programs by bringing rates in those programs to the middle or high end of the rate range.

Uniform Tasking Tool. The Executive Budget would remove the requirement for DOH to identify and implement a uniform task-based assessment tool and instead enable DOH to develop “guidelines and standards” for the use of tasking tools by plans and LDSS to support individualized determinations for utilization of home care services.

Cancer Coverage Expansion. The Executive Budget proposes to require health plans offering Medicaid, Essential Plan and Qualified Health Plans to contract with any willing NCI-designated cancer center at prevailing rates, established in the proposal as Medicaid FFS rates. The proposal would take effect on April 1, 2022.

Expiration of the MLTC Enrollment Cap. The Executive Budget would set a March 31, 2022, expiration date for the MLTC enrollment cap and corresponding premium withhold.

PACE Licensure Process. The Executive Budget would establish a new licensure process for PACE plans in order to streamline application and approval processes and expand access to service delivery for individuals in need of long-term care services.

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Essential Plan Proposals

Increase in EP Eligibility. The Executive Budget proposes expanding EP eligibility, increasing its current income cap from 200% FPL to 250% FPL, subject to federal approval.

EP Coverage for Pregnant Individuals and Newborns. The Executive Budget would allow pregnant individuals to stay enrolled in the EP; individuals and their newborns would receive one-year postpartum coverage, regardless of changes to income.

EP Coverage for Individuals with Long-Term Chronic Conditions. The Executive Budget would also expand EP eligibility and coverage to include individuals with long-term chronic illnesses or functional limitations, subject to federal approval.

Authority to Submit Needed Waiver(s) to CMS. The Executive Budget would provide DOH with authority to submit appropriate waiver applications (e.g., for a Section 1332 waiver) needed to implement coverage reforms.

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Child Health Plus (CHP) Proposals

Elimination of the CHP $9 Premium. The Executive Budget proposes to eliminate the $9 monthly CHP premium for children in families with a household income less than 223% FPL. This provision would take effect on April 1, 2022.

Expansion of CHP Behavioral Health Benefits. The Executive Budget would invest $11 million in SFY23, growing to $44 million in SFY24, to align the mental health and other services offered to children in CHP with those offered to children in Medicaid; this includes children’s home and community-based services, assertive community treatment services, residential rehabilitation for youth services, and health-related services provided by 29-I Voluntary Foster Care Agency Health Facilities. This provision would take effect on January 1, 2023.

CHP Rate-Setting Authority to DOH. The Executive Budget would transition the CHP rate-setting authority from the Department of Financial Services (DFS) to DOH to align with Medicaid managed care rate-setting processes. The proposal would authorize the commissioner of health to transition the CHP rate-setting function to DOH in coordination with the DFS superintendent effective January 1, 2023.

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Long-Term Care Proposals

Minimum Direct Care Spending Methodology. The Executive Budget would amend the minimum direct resident care spending law to exclude provider assessment revenue. The proposal would also exclude the capital per diem portion of the Medicaid reimbursement rate for all nursing homes with a CMS star rating of at least four, and on a case-by-case basis for all nursing homes with a CMS star rating of three.

Nursing Home Quality Pool (NHQP). The Executive Budget would authorize NHQP funds to be distributed through state appropriations, either fully or in addition to the current funding through Medicaid rate adjustments.

VAPAP Eligibility Expansion. The Executive Budget would expand VAPAP funding eligibility to include financially distressed nursing homes, adult care facilities, independent practice associations and accountable care organizations. It would authorize VAPAP funds to be made available pursuant to an evaluation process and submission of transformation plan.

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Hospitals-Related Proposals

Surprise Billing. The Executive Budget would align New York State law with the 2020 federal No Surprises Act consumer protections where necessary. These changes include expanding the New York IDR process to include providers in addition to physicians and hospitals that are eligible for the IDR process, adopting the federal “visit” definition, and to apply to all hospitals, rather than being limited to safety-net hospitals. The changes would take effect on April 1, 2022.

Delayed Rebasing for Acute Hospital Rates. The Executive Budget would delay the scheduled rebasing of rates for acute hospitals until no earlier than January 1, 2024. The savings contemplated by the proposal are not made clear but are noted as necessary to maintain the state’s Medicaid Global Cap, and would take effect on April 1, 2022.

Physicians Excess Medical Malpractice Program. The Executive Budget proposes to extend the Excess Medical Malpractice Program for one year through June 30, 2023. The proposal modifies the structure of the program to require excess coverage to be purchased by an eligible physician or dentist directly from a provider of excess insurance coverage. From funds available in the excess liability pool, DFS will reimburse 50% of the premium at the conclusion of the policy period, and the remaining 50% of the premium is to be paid one year after.

Third-Trimester Syphilis Screenings. The Executive Budget would expand the current requirement for syphilis testing during prenatal care to require a third-trimester screening as well. The proposal contemplates no savings in SFY23 or SFY24 and would take effect on April 1, 2023.

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Transfer of Facility Ownership Reforms

Character and Competence for Establishment Applications. The Executive Budget would require controlling persons of the proposed operator to be subject to character and competence review by PHHPC, and includes prior ownership/affiliations with any health-related or long-term care facility within the past seven years, to require that a substantially consistent high level of care is or was being provided at such facility or institution in which the individual was affiliated. The Executive Budget does not associate any savings or investments with the adoption of the proposal in SFY23, which would take effect on April 1, 2022.

Change of Ownership for Article 28 Providers. The Executive Budget would amend the current requirements for transfers or dispositions of ownership interests for Article 28 providers to align the requirements for business corporations with those of LLCs. No prior approval would be required for the transfer of less than 10% of the operator to an individual previously approved by PHHPC for the operator. Failure to obtain the necessary approvals will subject the operating certificate to revocation or suspension. The proposal would take effect immediately.

Change of Ownership for Article 36 Providers. The Executive Budget would amend the current requirements for transfers or dispositions of ownership interests for CHHAs and LHCSAs to align the requirements for business corporations with those of LLCs. For the transfer of ownership to an individual previously approved by PHHPC, the transaction shall not be effective unless the operator provides notice to PHHPC at least 90 days prior to the intended effective date. For the transfer of ownership to an individual not previously approved by PHHPC, which is limited to a 10% interest, the same 90-day notice to PHHPC would be required. Failure to obtain the necessary approvals will subject the operating certificate to revocation or suspension. For LHCSAs, the proposal also authorizes the commissioner to promulgate regulations directing whether a change of ownership application would be subject to a public need assessment. The proposal would take effect immediately.

Change of Ownership for Article 40 Hospices. The Executive Budget would amend the change of ownership process for established hospices to allow certain transfers to occur without the prior approval of PHHPC. No prior approval is required for a transfer of interest to any individual previously approved by PHHPC for the operator, provided the operator provides notice to PHHPC at least 90 days prior to the intended effective date. No prior approval is required for a transfer of less than 10% interest in the operator to an individual who has not been previously approved by PHHPC. The proposal would take effect immediately.

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Insurance-Related Proposals

Establishment of Telehealth Reimbursement Parity. The Executive Budget would require health plans, including Medicaid plans, to reimburse providers for services delivered via telehealth on the same basis, at the same rate and to the same extent as services delivered in person. The proposal contemplates no savings within the budget and would take effect on April 1, 2022.

Abortion Services Coverage. The Executive Budget would codify that individual and group private insurers must provide coverage for abortion services without copayments, coinsurance or annual deductibles (unless the policy is a high-deductible type plan). Exemptions would be allowed for religious employers. This coverage requirement would take effect on January 1, 2023.

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Pharmacy-Related Proposals

Elimination of Prescriber Prevails. The Executive Budget would make the necessary statutory changes to eliminate the prescriber prevails provision, effective June 1, 2022.

Expanded Access to Naloxone and Buprenorphine. The Executive Budget would require pharmacies in New York to maintain a 30-day stock of both an opioid antagonist and an opioid agonist to aid in the treatment of opioid use disorder. The proposal does not contemplate savings in SFY23 or SFY24 and would take effect 180 days from April 1, 2022.

New Pharmacy Benefits Bureau to Reduce Prescription Drug Costs. The Executive Budget proposes the creation of a new Pharmacy Benefits Bureau in DFS to lead efforts to lower drug prices. The new bureau would begin licensing pharmacy benefit managers (PBMs) and issue comprehensive regulations to ensure transparency and accountability for PBM practices. This bureau would also hire a compliance team to investigate PBM business practices and review complaints of misconduct.

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Human Services-Related Proposals

Human Services/Mental Hygiene Cost-of-Living Increase. The Executive Budget would include funding to support a 5.4% cost-of-living increase for human services workers.

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Behavioral Health-Related Proposals

Reinvestment of Medicaid Managed Care Recoupments From Underspending on Behavioral Health Services. The Executive Budget proposes to reinvest recovered funds into behavioral health services and appropriates $111 million for OMH and OASAS to fund rate increases for community mental health and addiction services, including clinics, and expansion of other essential community-based services and supports. The proposal would also eliminate the requirement for DOH to issue regulations on the methodology for calculating the savings and distributing funds for reinvestment. The proposal would take effect immediately.

Suicide Prevention and Behavioral Health Crisis Hotline—988. The Executive Budget would set up a “988” suicide prevention and behavioral health crisis hotline to connect New Yorkers in crisis with resources statewide. OMH and OASAS are empowered to set up hotline standards, and metrics regarding the hotline would be reported annually to the Governor and the legislature. The proposal contemplates no savings in SFY23 or SFY24 and would take effect on April 1, 2022.

Extension and Amendment of Provisions of Kendra’s Law. The Executive Budget would extend the provisions of Kendra’s Law through June 30, 2027. Additionally, the language proposes expanding eligibility criteria for recommendation of assisted outpatient therapy to those having concluded such treatment in the past six months and having experienced a substantial increase in symptoms in the interim, allowing examining physicians to testify at hearings by videoconference, and permitting directors of community services or their designees to require service providers to release information on persons receiving assisted outpatient treatment. The proposal contemplates $100,000 in savings over the arc of the state’s financial plan and would take effect on April 1, 2022.

Reform of Mental Hygiene Property Pass Through Laws. The Executive Budget would amend mental hygiene law to allow for OMH to reimburse supportive housing providers for property costs including rent, mortgage payments, loan principal and interest on loans in a fashion similar to payments allowable for community residences and residential care centers. The proposal does not contemplate express savings in either SFY23 or SFY24 and would take effect on April 1, 2022.

Permanent Authority for OMH and OPWDD to Appoint Temporary Operators. The Executive Budget would amend mental hygiene law to make permanent existing authority for OMH and OPWDD to appoint temporary operators to operate programs. The proposal does not contemplate express savings in either SFY23 or SFY24 and would take effect on April 1, 2022.

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Substance Abuse Treatment-Related Proposals

Certification for Recovery Residences. The Executive Budget would establish a voluntary certification process for recovery residences, also known as sober homes. The certification would be available to recovery-supportive housing that provides substance-free environments and mutual support for individuals engaged in the recovery process. It would authorize OASAS to develop standards for the operation of a certified recovery residence and the certification process, and conduct ongoing monitoring of certified recovery residences. The Executive Budget associates an investment of $850,000 in SFY23 and the proposal would take effect immediately.

Expansion of Scope of Existing Alcohol Abuse Program. The Executive Budget would amend the current OASAS capital program to allow for accelerated development of volunteer-operated addiction support services providers, and to allow the state to purchase property for development for such programs. The proposal does not contemplate savings in either SFY23 or SFY24 and would take effect on April 1, 2022.

OASAS Capital Program Reforms. The Executive Budget would establish an expedited process for the development of capital projects for volunteer-operated addiction service providers, and allow OASAS and DASNY to assume the responsibility for the development of capital projects by providers. It would also allow the state to purchase properties for development into addiction service facilities and create a pathway to transfer facilities to service providers. The proposal is designed to leverage DASNY’s experience to accelerate the development of new facilities on behalf of voluntary agencies. The proposal is part of the increase of $402 million (56%) in operating and capital support for OASAS and would take effect on April 1, 2022.

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Other Health-Related Proposals

Reshaping of the Office of Minority Health. The Executive Budget would rename the Office of Minority Health to the Office of Health Equity and would expand and realign the office’s mission to include, among other factors, a focus on health equity and social determinants of health for underserved populations in New York. The proposal contemplates no savings in SFY23 and would take effect on April 1, 2022.

Increased General Public Health Work County Support. The Executive Budget would amend the formula for annual base funding for full-service local health departments (LHDs) to the larger of $750,000 (increased from $650,000) or $1.30 per capita (increased from $.65 per capita). The proposal would expand the commissioner’s power to limit a municipality’s grant in circumstances where that municipality fails to provide all core public health services, by reducing the grant by no more than $570,500. The proposal would also allow LHDs to claim up to 50% of qualifying personnel fringe benefits for state aid reimbursement. The Executive Budget associates $25.7 million in investments in SFY23, and a full annual investment of $51.5 million in SFY24 in the program. There are no savings associated with the proposal, which would take effect on April 1, 2022.

Marriage Certificate Reforms. The Executive Budget would enact measures to allow for changes in name or gender to be more easily recognized on marriage certificates in New York. The proposal contemplates no savings in SFY23 or SFY24 and would take effect on April 1, 2023.

Public Health and Social Services Extensions of Law. The Executive Budget would extend several health-related statutes, including:

  • Extending the deadline for the state to determine an Assisted Living Program Need methodology to April 1, 2025, from April 1, 2023
  • Extending the authorization for the Statewide Patient-Centered Medical Home program for three years to April 1, 2025
  • Making permanent the authority to allow temporary operators of adult homes
  • Extending the authority of the department to make intergovernmental transfer and disproportionate share hospital payments to hospitals outside New York City for three years to March 31, 2025
  • Making permanent the authorization for pharmacists to enter into collaborative agreements with physicians in certain settings
  • Extending a statewide Medicaid integrity and efficiency partnership program with social service districts to enhance audit recoveries through March 31, 2024
  • Making permanent the distressed provider assistance program
  • Extending the delivery date of the Lyme and tick-borne disease working group to May 1, 2023, and the tick-borne disease and blood-borne pathogen impact study to October 1, 2022
  • Extending the delivery date for the rare disease working group’s report to December 20, 2022, and amending the repeal date to December 20, 2023
  • Extending the delivery date for the radon task force report to November 1, 2022, and amending the repeal date to December 31, 2022 

Any savings contemplated by the proposal are not made clear but are noted as necessary to maintain the state’s Medicaid Global Cap, and would take effect on April 1, 2022.

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